Green Growth for Gender Equality: Promoting Poverty Reduction and Social Inclusion

Green Growth for Gender Equality: Promoting Poverty Reduction and Social Inclusion


Global Green Growth Institute working with developing countries to achieve poverty reduction and inclusive sustainable economic growth Over the last two decades, the world has seen significant progress in human development People living in extreme poverty dropped from 47% in 1990 to 14% globally in 2015 Undernourished people in developing regions halved from 23.3% in 1990 to 12.9% in 2016 Since 1990, maternal mortality declined by 45% worldwide 24 million more girls are in school today compared to some 15 years ago Despite progress, challenges still remain and it is widely recognized that environmental sustainability and social inclusion are both needed to secure future economic growth Poverty reduction has come hand in hand with increased inequalities between regions and within countries Today sub-Saharan Africa has the World’s largest number of poor an estimated 1.7 billion adults lack access to financial services Indigenous people in many countries struggle with poverty due to limited of or non-existed land and cultural rights and the gender gap persists worldwide with fewer women represented in economic and political life. So economic growth has contributed to significant poverty reduction still 14% of the population lives in extreme poverty and the people that currently live in poverty are the people that have been harder to reach with targeted development programs The gender gap is still significant, women participated less than men worldwide in the labor market And women who constituted 50% of the population generate only 37% of the global GDP The impacts of exclusion are threatening future growth and environmental sustainability New models of growth that leave no one behind are needed Green growth that includes traditionally marginalized groups and is environmentally sustainable will ultimately create greater and more equal economic opportunities. You know, woman as a group is a natural resource for society, according to resource in the labor market a resource on boards, a resource in politics, a resource in business and companies. The economic potential of women’s inclusion in a nations’ economy is huge You can’t allow to let a part of your population be outside of the labor market, to be outside of the business market, to be outside of the politics. I think it is quite important for every country to be concious about what kind of resource it is to have both women and men into for example businesses and companies. I think that creates values, it creates development Women have not equally shared the development benefits, delivered in recent decades Women more than men like access to land rights and financial services and face more legal and social barriers to full economic empowerment Failure to close the gender gap has significant consequences to sustained economic growth. The Food and Agricultural Organization estimates that 100 million people could be lifted out of poverty if women had the same access to productive resources as men. Another study states that 12 trillion US dollars could be added to the global economy if the gender gap were closed. Women’s exclusion is also compounded by environmental degradation and the impacts of climate change Primarily reliant on agriculture poor women are made further vulnerable by economic shocks caused by drought, flooding and famine To able to cope with the insecurities that come along with climate change one needs resilience and the poor are much more vulnerable to external shocks. Women are also particularly vulnerable to climate change. Also because a lot of the tasks and duties assigned to women, relies on natural resources for example: wood collection, water collection and food preparation for families Women in least developed countries already spend hours a day just to provide for the family and take care of the young and the elderly which also leaves women with less opportunities to be active economically and to gain economic empowerment To address the challenges, green growth represents a development paradigm that promises economic returns environmental benefits and social impacts The Global Green Growth Institute works with governments in emerging economies and developing countries to transform economies and delivering inclusive green growth GGGI promotes strategies, policies, green investment projects and services that actively empower women and traditionally marginalized groups in decision making and create equal economic opportunities. Specifically, GGGI is working with governments to mainstream gender equality poverty reduction and social inclusion in national green growth plans While at the same time engaging private sector partners to develop inclusive business models that enhance likelihoods and economic opportunities GGGI has focused on inclusive green growth across our program In Mexico we are supporting the closing of the gender gap in employment, particularly in the energy value chain. In Peru we are promoting land rights for women which will provide them with direct access in control of productive access in resources In Lao PDR we are recommending ways to increase women’s access to financial resources needed to transform livelihoods and ways to also overcome some of the cultural and structural barriers to women’s economic empowerment In Indonesia, GGGI is working to include women in peatland restoration projects. GGGI’s work for gender equality is being implemented across its country programs In Ethiopia, under the climate resilient green economy framework GGGI assistance has trained women to take leadership roles within their communities to implement sustainable agricultural techniques that are more resilient to flooding and drought GGGI’s work to install solar power freezers in rural off-grid tourist bungalows in Vanuatu has prioritized the training of women to service the freezers and manage financial activities associated with Bungalow operations Tourism is important to us because this is the only way we can get the money from to sustain our families and other needs. Before we have the solar freezers, we don’t have these types of food we only have the foods that we prepared and then the tourists eat. But leftovers, we don’t store them GGGI’s program in Colombia’s Amazon region has sought to implement sustainable land practices that economically benefit both local indigenous groups and cattle ranchers many of whom are women GGGI is uniquely positioned within developing country governments to produce strategies and implementing tools that promote gender equality and greater economic opportunities for women I would characterize GGGI’s works on social inclusion in that way they are bringing this along with green growth economy initiative which is also a part of the climate work and a part of the development work So the green growth initiative have been successful so far To scale up its sustainability efforts and impacts GGGI will continue working with governments to align development goals with environmental sustainability and gender equality and strengthen its public and private sector partnerships to increase social inclusion Delivering inclusive green growth is a multi-stakeholder effort and we are depending on the political will and support of our members governments Particularly we need our developed governments to continue to keep inclusive growth high on the agenda The economic potential and development benefits of inclusion and environmental sustainability are enormous Inclusive green growth will ensure that future generations also have these benefits and opportunities. GGGI is delivering transformative green growth that benefits everyone GGGI committed to reducing poverty and creating economic opportunities for all through social inclusive environmentally sustainable green growth

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